Saturday, May 30, 2009

Discussion Board: Is Alcohol a Drug?

Some medical historians have said that if alcohol was discovered today, it would be classified as a schedule 2 drug.

Use your textbook Mosby's Pathology for Massage Therapists 2e and other reliable sources to research drug schedules as well as the side effects and abuse potential of alcohol. Include in your research legal alcohol consumption limits in your state.

Discussion Question: If you suspected that your client was intoxicated when he or she arrived for a massage, what treatment modifications would you employ, if any?

Be sure and support your position.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

JP #22 Use lighter pressure on the client. even if the cleint ask to apply heavier pressure you should not because they may not be able to feel the pressure at the time . use your own judgement on the pressure you dont want to hurt you client later.

*LillaVi* said...

hello ;)

dh said...

#14 dh This is a very contriversal subject for some people. Therapist that work in an establishment that serves alcohol sometimes has to make a choice of job over what is quite possible the right thing to do. When a therapist on their own, where every dollar counts, will some time give in to temptation. Some things to think about if one so chooses to massage an intoxicated client, is the poison that is being sent thru their system when massage is being performed and the deminished sense of touch the client and alcohol dehydrates the body, ample amounts of water is needed after a massage. Also modifications of pressure and technique will be required. Each state consumption limits are different and most therapist do not require a breathilizer.

dh said...

#14 dh This is a very contriversal subject for some people. Therapist that work in an establishment that serves alcohol sometimes has to make a choice of job over what is quite possible the right thing to do. When a therapist on their own, where every dollar counts, will some time give in to temptation. Some things to think about if one so chooses to massage an intoxicated client, is the poison that is being sent thru their system when massage is being performed and the deminished sense of touch the client and alcohol dehydrates the body, ample amounts of water is needed after a massage. Also modifications of pressure and technique will be required. Each state consumption limits are different and most therapist do not require a breathilizer.

Anonymous said...

SB #3 The idea that I would encounter a client that was legally intoxicated would mean that the client had a blood alcohol limit of .08 or higher which in the state law of Louisana is the legal alcohol limit.

Anonymous said...

CP#21
Alcohol is a drug that impairs senses, and judgment. It will dehydrating the client and they can be emotionally unpredictable. they might get nauseous during the massage, or need to urinate frequently. If possible, getting the client to reschedule might be a good idea if they are severely intoxicated. Making sure that they drink water before and after the massage will be important. moderating pressure, and frequent checks with the client to be sure they are not dizzy or nauseous might also be necessary. Also, if the client is an alcoholic, they could have liver damage that might be possible so avoiding the abdomen, and lighter massage might be necessary to avoid bruising.

Louisiana Institute said...

Is alcohol a stimulant or a depressant? How does this factor this in to your response?

Anonymous said...

JM19 There are lots of responses b/c there are lots of variables...i guess if a client came for her appt and i knew that she'd had a couple of glasses of wine before she came, i might just offer water before and make sure she didn't need the ladies' room before we got started. i would assume that if a person drank a little before a massage that they needed a little extra help to relax. i'd prolly just give her a relaxation massage...nothing too deep.
on the other hand, if a person came in for their massage and was clearly wasted...i.e. unable to maintain balance, speak with clear diction or walk a straight line, i would have to turn them down. (it would be doubly awkward since i also couldn't let them drive home..)
to answer the main question: Yes. Alcohol is a drug. Just like any drug (legal or otherwise), too much of it can get you kicked out of your massage therapist's room.